Invention of the Lithium Ion Re-chargeable Battery

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Lithium-Ion Battery:— Rachid Yazami is one of the four inventors of the rechargeable lithium ion battery;[n. 1][1] a Morroccan Muslim,[2] who's technology was used in 8 billion batteries in 2012 alone.[3][n. 2] His specific contribution was the physical invention of the graphite anode (or, the negative electrode) that allowed the battery to recharge multiple times.[3][4] The electrochemical properties of lithium and graphite were discovered by him in 1980 where he found lithium intercalated with graphite,[5] and by 1991, Japanese technology company, Sony, released the first consumer produced lithium ion batteries using his technology.[5] Yazami's technology is still relevent today, as his invention is vital for future battery nanotechnology, chiefly for the purposes that nanomaterials offer larger surface areas, short electron transport lengths, high reversible capacities and long life cycles.[5] Every year approximately 6 billion lithium ion batteries are sold, representing about 40% of all cell sales.[6] By 2020, the batteries will become so important that they will be worth $22 billion dollars alone for the car industry.[6] Lithium-ion batteries are currently one of three rechargeable batteries used today, the others being Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) and Nickel-metal Hydride (NiMH), however Li-ion dominate growth.[n. 3][n. 4] Yazami also invented a smart chip that can charge cell phone batteries fully in 10 minutes by using sensors in 2015.[7]

Yazami discovered the graphite anode, which is crucial to Li-ion batteries. Yazami's technology also made lithium ion batteries extremely safe to recharge as well, leading to their widespread success.[7]
Yazami discovered the graphite anode, which is crucial to Li-ion batteries. Yazami's technology also made lithium ion batteries extremely safe to recharge as well, leading to their widespread success.[7]

Lithium-Ion Battery:— Rachid Yazami is one of the four inventors of the rechargeable lithium ion battery;[n. 5][1] a Morroccan Muslim,[2] who's technology was used in 8 billion batteries in 2012 alone.[3][n. 6] His specific contribution was the physical invention of the graphite anode (or, the negative electrode) that allowed the battery to recharge multiple times.[3][4] The electrochemical properties of lithium and graphite were discovered by him in 1980 where he found lithium intercalated with graphite,[5] and by 1991, Japanese technology company, Sony, released the first consumer produced lithium ion batteries using his technology.[5] Yazami's technology is still relevent today, as his invention is vital for future battery nanotechnology, chiefly for the purposes that nanomaterials offer larger surface areas, short electron transport lengths, high reversible capacities and long life cycles.[5] Every year approximately 6 billion lithium ion batteries are sold, representing about 40% of all cell sales.[6] By 2020, the batteries will become so important that they will be worth $22 billion dollars alone for the car industry.[6] Lithium-ion batteries are currently one of three rechargeable batteries used today, the others being Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) and Nickel-metal Hydride (NiMH), however Li-ion dominate growth.[n. 7][n. 8] Yazami also invented a smart chip that can charge cell phone batteries fully in 10 minutes by using sensors in 2015.[7]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. ^ The others being Yoshio Nishi, Akira Yoshino and John B. Goodenough
    1. UT Austin's John B. Goodenough Wins Engineering's Highest Honor for Pioneering Lithium-Ion Battery. January 6th, 2014. The University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  2. ^ In 2016, Lithium ion batteries had $15 billion dollars in annual sales
    1. Zainab Calcuttawala (March 4th, 2016). Nominated for Prestigious Engineering Award. Morocco World News. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  3. ^ However in 2003 alone lithium ion batteries accounted for 73% of total sales (amounting to $3.8 billion dollars; placing a perspective on this). Furthermore 90% of cell phones, camcorders, and laptops adopted the technology in the early 2000s.
    1. Masaki Yoshio; Ralph J. Brodd; Akiya Kozawa (17 July 2010). Lithium-Ion Batteries: Science and Technologies. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 368. ISBN 978-0-387-34445-4.
  4. ^ Additionally, Li-ion batteries are also far superior to anything else on the market in terms of energy density packing, and are wildly popular for their uses in portable devices.
    1. Dhanesh Chandra,* Wen-Ming Chien and Anjali Talekar (2011). Metal Hydrides for NiMH Battery Applications. Sigma Aldrich. Material Matters. Vol. 6. No. 2. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  5. ^ The others being Yoshio Nishi, Akira Yoshino and John B. Goodenough
    1. UT Austin's John B. Goodenough Wins Engineering's Highest Honor for Pioneering Lithium-Ion Battery. January 6th, 2014. The University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  6. ^ In 2016, Lithium ion batteries had $15 billion dollars in annual sales
    1. Zainab Calcuttawala (March 4th, 2016). Nominated for Prestigious Engineering Award. Morocco World News. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  7. ^ However in 2003 alone lithium ion batteries accounted for 73% of total sales (amounting to $3.8 billion dollars; placing a perspective on this). Furthermore 90% of cell phones, camcorders, and laptops adopted the technology in the early 2000s.
    1. Masaki Yoshio; Ralph J. Brodd; Akiya Kozawa (17 July 2010). Lithium-Ion Batteries: Science and Technologies. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 368. ISBN 978-0-387-34445-4.
  8. ^ Additionally, Li-ion batteries are also far superior to anything else on the market in terms of energy density packing, and are wildly popular for their uses in portable devices.
    1. Dhanesh Chandra,* Wen-Ming Chien and Anjali Talekar (2011). Metal Hydrides for NiMH Battery Applications. Sigma Aldrich. Material Matters. Vol. 6. No. 2. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.

References

  1. ^ a b UT Austin's John B. Goodenough Wins Engineering's Highest Honor for Pioneering Lithium-Ion Battery. January 6th, 2014. The University of Texas at Austin. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Morocco World News (January 7th, 2016). Moroccan Scientist Rachid Yazami Ranked Among ‘10 Muslims Who Ruled 2015’. Morocco World News. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Anthony SC Teo (8 December 2014). Univer-Cities: Strategic View of the Future: From Berkeley and Cambridge to Singapore and Rising AsiaVolume II. World Scientific. p. 242. ISBN 978-981-4644-46-4.
  4. ^ a b Alexandr A. Berlin; Roman Joswik; Vatin Nikolai Ivanovich (21 September 2015). Engineering Textiles: Research Methodologies, Concepts, and Modern Applications. Apple Academic Press. p. 297. ISBN 978-1-4987-0603-2.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Q Wei (24 May 2012). Functional Nanofibers and their Applications. Elsevier Science. p. 197-198. ISBN 978-0-85709-564-0.
  6. ^ a b c d Christian Julien; Alain Mauger; Ashok Vijh; Karim Zaghib (28 September 2015). Lithium Batteries: Science and Technology. Springer. p. 60. ISBN 978-3-319-19108-9.
  7. ^ a b c d Mary-Ann Russon (November 26th, 2015). Singapore scientist develops smart chip that charges smartphones in less than 10 minutes. International Business Times. Retrieved September 28th, 2016.

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