List of YouTubers of Muslim Heritage (English Language)

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Qualification Criteria:— There are many successful Muslim content creators on YouTube, the categorization of which requires strict selection criteria. Their criteria for inclusion is based upon a systematic set of rules, in order to better manage this article. Therefore selection criteria includes that personalities must be able speak the English language in the majority of their videos, and must not solely be religious channels. A further qualification for inclusion is that they must also have approximately 75 million views or more on their channel (or channels if they own multiple accounts); although some exemptions exist. Inclusion criteria is based not only on subscriber count alone, which notably alters as the popularity of a YouTuber inclines or declines, further exacerbated by their rate of uploading or there lack of. In contrast, the view count which is the only static variable, provides a good indicator of the relevancy of a personality. This therefore shortens the list of YouTubers for inclusion to those mentioned below. It should be noted that this is not a complete list, as more will be added in due course, as publicity surrounding newer YouTubers grows. Religious channels are excluded on the basis that these channels tend to be very large. Also excluded are channels owned by celebrities, and those which contain accumulated talks from Islamic scholars or da'wah organisations. The aim of this article is to look beyond only religious Muslim Youtubers.

Zaid Ali, a comedian, who has accumulated some 135 million views for his comedy skits.
Zaid Ali, a comedian, who has accumulated some 135 million views for his comedy skits.

Qualification Criteria:— There are many successful Muslim content creators on YouTube, the categorization of which requires strict selection criteria. Their criteria for inclusion is based upon a systematic set of rules, in order to better manage this article. Therefore selection criteria includes that personalities must be able speak the English language in the majority of their videos, and must not solely be religious channels. A further qualification for inclusion is that they must also have approximately 75 million views or more on their channel (or channels if they own multiple accounts); although some exemptions exist. Inclusion criteria is based not only on subscriber count alone, which notably alters as the popularity of a YouTuber inclines or declines, further exacerbated by their rate of uploading or there lack of. In contrast, the view count which is the only static variable, provides a good indicator of the relevancy of a personality. This therefore shortens the list of YouTubers for inclusion to those mentioned below. It should be noted that this is not a complete list, as more will be added in due course, as publicity surrounding newer YouTubers grows. Religious channels are excluded on the basis that these channels tend to be very large. Also excluded are channels owned by celebrities, and those which contain accumulated talks from Islamic scholars or da'wah organisations. The aim of this article is to look beyond only religious Muslim Youtubers.

Gallery

Over 5,000,000 Subscribers

Erakat with Ryan Higa (nigahiga).[n. 1]

Yousef Erakat:— also known as "FouseyTube" is a successful[n. 2] Palestinian[1]-American YouTuber from California.[2][n. 3] Born on January 22nd, 1990,[n. 4] he is the youngest of four children.[2] He has a brother that is a children's doctor in New York, and a sister who is a human right's lawyer and activist.[2] Erakat created his channel on March 25th, 2011,[n. 5] concentrating mostly on Middle-eastern skits (focusing on stereotypes and issues affecting Muslims, which the BBC noted were "spoof videos about his family and his Palestinian roots"),[2][n. 6] but later moving towards prank videos and other creative endeavours.[2] He claims his alter ego, FouseyTube, became more prominant as the years went by, blowing up his channel.[2] It should however be noted that "Fousey" is simply Erakat's character; his original self was not well received by his fans when he first revealed himself in his normal surroundings (in the vlog, "Reign of Simba").[2] Erakat studied theatre arts at San Jose State University, California, after high school, where he was even ridiculed by one his teachers for using YouTube as a creative platform. Despite his large fan-base, Erakat has stayed away from political issues,[n. 7] for which he has been criticised for by the Palestinian community who would like the cultural and literal ethnic genocide in Palestine by Israel to be given more coverage. He also owns DOSEofFOUSEY and his now defunct MORNINGSwithFOUSEY channels. His channel has accumulated some 1.4 billion views,[3] whilst his 2nd and 3rd channels total 514 million views,[4] and 8.2 million views respectively.[5][n. 8]

Erakat with Ryan Higa (nigahiga).[n. 9]

Yousef Erakat:— also known as "FouseyTube" is a successful[n. 10] Palestinian[1]-American YouTuber from California.[2][n. 11] Born on January 22nd, 1990,[n. 12] he is the youngest of four children.[2] He has a brother that is a children's doctor in New York, and a sister who is a human right's lawyer and activist.[2] Erakat created his channel on March 25th, 2011,[n. 13] concentrating mostly on Middle-eastern skits (focusing on stereotypes and issues affecting Muslims, which the BBC noted were "spoof videos about his family and his Palestinian roots"),[2][n. 14] but later moving towards prank videos and other creative endeavours.[2] He claims his alter ego, FouseyTube, became more prominant as the years went by, blowing up his channel.[2] It should however be noted that "Fousey" is simply Erakat's character; his original self was not well received by his fans when he first revealed himself in his normal surroundings (in the vlog, "Reign of Simba").[2] Erakat studied theatre arts at San Jose State University, California, after high school, where he was even ridiculed by one his teachers for using YouTube as a creative platform. Despite his large fan-base, Erakat has stayed away from political issues,[n. 15] for which he has been criticised for by the Palestinian community who would like the cultural and literal ethnic genocide in Palestine by Israel to be given more coverage. He also owns DOSEofFOUSEY and his now defunct MORNINGSwithFOUSEY channels. His channel has accumulated some 1.4 billion views,[3] whilst his 2nd and 3rd channels total 514 million views,[4] and 8.2 million views respectively.[5][n. 16]

Over 3,000,000 Subscribers

The Young Turks:— The Young Turks is an online news show created by Cenk Ugyur, who is of Muslim heritage, though he is an agnostic Muslim.[6] The company can be found at 6230 Wilshire Boulevard, Box Suite 140, Los Angeles, CA 90048, United States.[7] The show was broadcast in 2002 on Sirius Satellite Radio, which converted to an online talk show in 2006 (rejecting a $250,000 dollar contract to make it an exclusive radio only show).[8] When it was placed online it initially started out with no views, but within the end of the month totalled 30,000 views.[8] In February 2010 it achieved 200 million total views in February 2010;[8] getting 13 million views per month on Youtube alone.[8] In April 2013, TYT hit 1 billion total views on its Youtube channel,[9][10][11] It reached 2 billion views in July 2015.[12] By 2014, it was averaging 68 million views per month from all of it's channels, 38 million of which were directly from the main TYT channel.[13] In May 2015, the show attracted 2.9 million unique video views in the US alone for that month.[14] In 2010, Cenk operated the show with a $45,000 dollar a month budget (totaling $540,000 dollars a year).[8] The Guardian reported the show's income was around $60,000 dollars a month from June 2008 ($720,000 dollars a year).[8] Revenues were $1,000,000—$1,750,000 dollars in 2014, which doubled to $2,000,000—$3,500,000 dollars in 2015.[14] It had also secured $4,000,000 dollars worth of funding by former Louisiana Governor, Buddy Roemer through his company Roemer, Robinson, Melville & Co., LLC, with an option to raise it up to $8,000,000 dollars.[13][15] By January 2016, TYT had 55 employees,[16] and numerous paying members at tytnetwork.com.

TYT in 2002 and 2015.
TYT in 2002 and 2015.

The Young Turks:— The Young Turks is an online news show created by Cenk Ugyur, who is of Muslim heritage, though he is an agnostic Muslim.[6] The company can be found at 6230 Wilshire Boulevard, Box Suite 140, Los Angeles, CA 90048, United States.[7] The show was broadcast in 2002 on Sirius Satellite Radio, which converted to an online talk show in 2006 (rejecting a $250,000 dollar contract to make it an exclusive radio only show).[8] When it was placed online it initially started out with no views, but within the end of the month totalled 30,000 views.[8] In February 2010 it achieved 200 million total views in February 2010;[8] getting 13 million views per month on Youtube alone.[8] In April 2013, TYT hit 1 billion total views on its Youtube channel,[9][10][11] It reached 2 billion views in July 2015.[12] By 2014, it was averaging 68 million views per month from all of it's channels, 38 million of which were directly from the main TYT channel.[13] In May 2015, the show attracted 2.9 million unique video views in the US alone for that month.[14] In 2010, Cenk operated the show with a $45,000 dollar a month budget (totaling $540,000 dollars a year).[8] The Guardian reported the show's income was around $60,000 dollars a month from June 2008 ($720,000 dollars a year).[8] Revenues were $1,000,000—$1,750,000 dollars in 2014, which doubled to $2,000,000—$3,500,000 dollars in 2015.[14] It had also secured $4,000,000 dollars worth of funding by former Louisiana Governor, Buddy Roemer through his company Roemer, Robinson, Melville & Co., LLC, with an option to raise it up to $8,000,000 dollars.[13][15] By January 2016, TYT had 55 employees,[16] and numerous paying members at tytnetwork.com.

Over 2,000,000 Subscribers

KassemG.

Kassem Gharaibeh:— was born on October 10th, 1983, and is one of the most successful YouTube personalities on the website, having created his channel on October 25th, 2006, accumulating 2.62 million subscribers and 437 million views.[17] It was confirmed in an interview with DIG magazine that he was from a Muslim family,[n. 17] although he did not grow up "practising" Islam. He is most well known for his series, "California On..." and "Going Deep".[18] The second series is particularly controversial as he interviews adult stars of pornographic films.[18][19] Gharaibeh is signed with Maker Studios (with the Hollywood Reporter reporting that, Gharaibeh, along with Shay Carl Butler (Shaycarl), are actually the founders of Maker Studios[20][21]), the same studio that has also signed PewDiePie;[22] who at this time, is the most successful YouTuber in the entire history of the website with over 40 million subscribers.[22] The network is now owned by Disney.[22] Shay Carl discovered Gharaibeh when he was doing stand up comedy at Chinese restaurants on the weekends, whilst he worked at Best Buy on the weekdays.[18] His initial studio offered him $1,000 dollars per month if he'd make more than one video every three weeks, and upload them onto YouTube.[18] This was enough for him to pay his own rent and quit his day job.[18] Prior to his break he was doing videos on YouTube for fun.[18] Gharaibeh has previously went on hiatus before, not uploading for approximately eight months at one time in 2015.[23] Maker Studio's was later sold for $500 million dollars,[24] how much Gharaibeh got from the sale is unknown, though he said it's scale was surprising.[25]

Khan Academy:— is a channel that was first launched on November 17th, 2006,[26] by Salman Khan, having accumulated more than 2.84 million subscribers,[26] and 946.9 million views shared between 6,184 uploaded videos.[26] It is one of the top rated "how to" channels on the site, with Social Blade ranking the channel at a "A-" in terms of it's popularity as of November 8th, 2016.[26] In the month of October 2016 alone he received more than 28 million views for his channel.[26] According to the New York Times, Salman Khan, founder of Khan Academy, was financed with $16.5 million dollars by Bill Gates, the Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF) and the O’Sullivan Foundation.[27] He first began tutoring his relatives in 2004, but the increasing demand of his family saw him move onto Youtube.[28] Three years later, Khan was making enough money to retire from his financial analyst role in 2009. By 2010, he accumulated over 458 million views. Salman has a master's degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and a masters of Business Administration, having graduated with these degrees from Harvard University.[28] Initially, he was amazed that his videos were even getting views outside of his relatives, thinking it was "neat" that 14 strangers alone had watched one of his tutorials.[28] Khan however receives far more attention on his own website, having 42 million registered users from 190 different countries.[29] Khan is now also involved private schooling, the first of which was so successful that it was going to expand to include 400 students.[30]

Khan Academy was founded by Salman Khan.
KassemG.

Kassem Gharaibeh:— was born on October 10th, 1983, and is one of the most successful YouTube personalities on the website, having created his channel on October 25th, 2006, accumulating 2.62 million subscribers and 437 million views.[17] It was confirmed in an interview with DIG magazine that he was from a Muslim family,[n. 18] although he did not grow up "practising" Islam. He is most well known for his series, "California On..." and "Going Deep".[18] The second series is particularly controversial as he interviews adult stars of pornographic films.[18][19] Gharaibeh is signed with Maker Studios (with the Hollywood Reporter reporting that, Gharaibeh, along with Shay Carl Butler (Shaycarl), are actually the founders of Maker Studios[20][21]), the same studio that has also signed PewDiePie;[22] who at this time, is the most successful YouTuber in the entire history of the website with over 40 million subscribers.[22] The network is now owned by Disney.[22] Shay Carl discovered Gharaibeh when he was doing stand up comedy at Chinese restaurants on the weekends, whilst he worked at Best Buy on the weekdays.[18] His initial studio offered him $1,000 dollars per month if he'd make more than one video every three weeks, and upload them onto YouTube.[18] This was enough for him to pay his own rent and quit his day job.[18] Prior to his break he was doing videos on YouTube for fun.[18] Gharaibeh has previously went on hiatus before, not uploading for approximately eight months at one time in 2015.[23] Maker Studio's was later sold for $500 million dollars,[24] how much Gharaibeh got from the sale is unknown, though he said it's scale was surprising.[25]

Khan Academy was founded by Salman Khan.

Khan Academy:— is a channel that was first launched on November 17th, 2006,[26] by Salman Khan, having accumulated more than 2.84 million subscribers,[26] and 946.9 million views shared between 6,184 uploaded videos.[26] It is one of the top rated "how to" channels on the site, with Social Blade ranking the channel at a "A-" in terms of it's popularity as of November 8th, 2016.[26] In the month of October 2016 alone he received more than 28 million views for his channel.[26] According to the New York Times, Salman Khan, founder of Khan Academy, was financed with $16.5 million dollars by Bill Gates, the Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF) and the O’Sullivan Foundation.[27] He first began tutoring his relatives in 2004, but the increasing demand of his family saw him move onto Youtube.[28] Three years later, Khan was making enough money to retire from his financial analyst role in 2009. By 2010, he accumulated over 458 million views. Salman has a master's degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and a masters of Business Administration, having graduated with these degrees from Harvard University.[28] Initially, he was amazed that his videos were even getting views outside of his relatives, thinking it was "neat" that 14 strangers alone had watched one of his tutorials.[28] Khan however receives far more attention on his own website, having 42 million registered users from 190 different countries.[29] Khan is now also involved private schooling, the first of which was so successful that it was going to expand to include 400 students.[30]

Over 1,000,000 Subscribers

Huda Kattan, has 15.6 million Instagram followers, and worked with actresses such as Eva Longoria.

Huda Beauty:— Huda Kattan is a make-up blogger, notable for having more than 15.6 million Instagram followers,[31] 1.53 million Youtuber subscribers, with 94.5 million views to her main channel.[32] In August 2016 she launched her own make-up brand, founded with her sisters, Mona Kattan and Aly Kattan; with her products being sold in Harrods and Sephora.[33] Kattan has worked as a make-up artist for actresses such as Eva Longoria and Nicole Richie.[33] Al Bawaba, a UAE newspaper, has called her "one of the most successful and progressive beauty brands and personalities" from the UAE.[34] According to "Cosmopolitan", she is particularly notable for her humour.[35] She went into beauty as a result of being laid off from work, where she originally worked in finance.[35] She was told straight up by her boss "[y]ou don't belong here" despite her working extremely hard.[35] She moved to Los Angeles after this, and set up to study make up, which had been a passion of hers for a long time.[35] After finishing her course, she was unable to find work for several years, but kept at her passion, even working for free, until she landed a job with Revlon.[35] Kattan was born in the US, and grew up in the Islamophobically racist state of Tennessee.[35][36] She moved out perhaps because of the primitive nature of the locals, who are so racist to Muslims that they have been refused civil rights, spent $343,276 dollars fighting one mosque from getting built,[37] and bombed numerous Islamic buildings.[38][39]

Karim Metwaly:— is an Egyptian-American YouTuber who has accumulated 256,000 subscribers and 1.2 million subscribers for his two channels, the former being a vlog based channel called "KUKU" (formerly "AreWeKuKuNow"), and the second his main channel, called "KARIM" (formerly "AreWeFamousNow"),[40][41] which focuses on social experiments, racism, and Islamophobia. His former channel has gained 23 million views, whilst his second has attained, 142.4 million views.[40][41] He has been active on YouTube since November 22nd, 2009.[40] His most successful experiment videos are "10 Hours of Walking in NYC as a Woman in Hijab" (with 13 million views), and the "MUSLIM WOMAN BEATEN IN PUBLIC EXPERIMENT" (with 9.6 million views) and "WOULD YOU DATE A MUSLIM?" (with 5.2 million views).[42][43] He has also done several music video parodies, such as Katy Perry's "Dark Horse", and Psy's "Gagnam Style".[42] Perhaps his most viewed video is his most controversial,[44] amongst another one where he designed an experiment where a Muslim woman and a Jewish man were walking hand in hand in Muslim and Jewish neighbourhoods, with the most vitriolic reaction coming from the Jewish boroughs where the actors were assaulted with a water bottle.[45] Metwaly has also responded to, confronted and/or challenged several Islamophobic users on YouTube, including one atheist YouTuber who spat inside a Qu'ran and then proceeded to metaphorically "sexually assault" it. One of his interesting videos has been challenging Singoporian Amos Lee, who is known for trolling Christians.[46]

Karim, with Adam Saleh.
Karim, with Adam Saleh.

Adam Saleh:— Originally Adam Saleh and his partner Sheikh Akbar were a duo, who together formed what is known as "TrueStory ASA".[47][48] The two made videos together pranking people and creating comedy skits, which according to the BBC were viewed million of times across the internet.[49] Saleh has been active since at least 2012, often using social media as a platform to promote the message of Islam, as well as documenting his own life.[47] Saleh originally created videos out of fun, but later revealed that his direction towards promoting Islam was down to the fact that one his former friends found out he was Muslim (as his mother wears a hijab), who subsequently cut off all ties with him based on his faith.[47] Since that day the two never spoke despite Saleh trying to call him numerous times.[47] This propelled Saleh to create videos about his faith.[47] As a a result Saleh's channel became hugely successful, which has seen his channel grow so much so that he even gained the attention of Ellen DeGeneres when he entered her "Dance Dare" competition.[47] Saleh has not been without controversy however.[47] In 2015 it was revealed he was paid £26,000 pounds by British police to rap about issues affecting the Muslim youth.[50] He is also allegedly paid $3,000 dollars per Instagram post.[51] His vlog channel has 1.62 million subscribers, and 362 million views; and his main channel has 1.57 million subscribers and 156 million views.[52][53]

Huda Kattan, has 15.6 million Instagram followers, and worked with actresses such as Eva Longoria.

Huda Beauty:— Huda Kattan is a make-up blogger, notable for having more than 15.6 million Instagram followers,[31] 1.53 million Youtuber subscribers, with 94.5 million views to her main channel.[32] In August 2016 she launched her own make-up brand, founded with her sisters, Mona Kattan and Aly Kattan; with her products being sold in Harrods and Sephora.[33] Kattan has worked as a make-up artist for actresses such as Eva Longoria and Nicole Richie.[33] Al Bawaba, a UAE newspaper, has called her "one of the most successful and progressive beauty brands and personalities" from the UAE.[34] According to "Cosmopolitan", she is particularly notable for her humour.[35] She went into beauty as a result of being laid off from work, where she originally worked in finance.[35] She was told straight up by her boss "[y]ou don't belong here" despite her working extremely hard.[35] She moved to Los Angeles after this, and set up to study make up, which had been a passion of hers for a long time.[35] After finishing her course, she was unable to find work for several years, but kept at her passion, even working for free, until she landed a job with Revlon.[35] Kattan was born in the US, and grew up in the Islamophobically racist state of Tennessee.[35][36] She moved out perhaps because of the primitive nature of the locals, who are so racist to Muslims that they have been refused civil rights, spent $343,276 dollars fighting one mosque from getting built,[37] and bombed numerous Islamic buildings.[38][39]

Karim, with Adam Saleh.

Karim Metwaly:— is an Egyptian-American YouTuber who has accumulated 256,000 subscribers and 1.2 million subscribers for his two channels, the former being a vlog based channel called "KUKU" (formerly "AreWeKuKuNow"), and the second his main channel, called "KARIM" (formerly "AreWeFamousNow"),[40][41] which focuses on social experiments, racism, and Islamophobia. His former channel has gained 23 million views, whilst his second has attained, 142.4 million views.[40][41] He has been active on YouTube since November 22nd, 2009.[40] His most successful experiment videos are "10 Hours of Walking in NYC as a Woman in Hijab" (with 13 million views), and the "MUSLIM WOMAN BEATEN IN PUBLIC EXPERIMENT" (with 9.6 million views) and "WOULD YOU DATE A MUSLIM?" (with 5.2 million views).[42][43] He has also done several music video parodies, such as Katy Perry's "Dark Horse", and Psy's "Gagnam Style".[42] Perhaps his most viewed video is his most controversial,[44] amongst another one where he designed an experiment where a Muslim woman and a Jewish man were walking hand in hand in Muslim and Jewish neighbourhoods, with the most vitriolic reaction coming from the Jewish boroughs where the actors were assaulted with a water bottle.[45] Metwaly has also responded to, confronted and/or challenged several Islamophobic users on YouTube, including one atheist YouTuber who spat inside a Qu'ran and then proceeded to metaphorically "sexually assault" it. One of his interesting videos has been challenging Singoporian Amos Lee, who is known for trolling Christians.[46]

Karim, with Adam Saleh.

Adam Saleh:— Originally Adam Saleh and his partner Sheikh Akbar were a duo, who together formed what is known as "TrueStory ASA".[47][48] The two made videos together pranking people and creating comedy skits, which according to the BBC were viewed million of times across the internet.[49] Saleh has been active since at least 2012, often using social media as a platform to promote the message of Islam, as well as documenting his own life.[47] Saleh originally created videos out of fun, but later revealed that his direction towards promoting Islam was down to the fact that one his former friends found out he was Muslim (as his mother wears a hijab), who subsequently cut off all ties with him based on his faith.[47] Since that day the two never spoke despite Saleh trying to call him numerous times.[47] This propelled Saleh to create videos about his faith.[47] As a a result Saleh's channel became hugely successful, which has seen his channel grow so much so that he even gained the attention of Ellen DeGeneres when he entered her "Dance Dare" competition.[47] Saleh has not been without controversy however.[47] In 2015 it was revealed he was paid £26,000 pounds by British police to rap about issues affecting the Muslim youth.[50] He is also allegedly paid $3,000 dollars per Instagram post.[51] His vlog channel has 1.62 million subscribers, and 362 million views; and his main channel has 1.57 million subscribers and 156 million views.[52][53]

Over 500,000 Subscribers

Dina Torkio (and Sid):— is a half-White, half-Egyptian British YouTuber,[54][55] who, along with her British Pakistani husband Sid own several large channels. One of them is Torkio's own fashion channel,[56][57][n. 19] "Dina Tokio", channel whilst the other belongs jointly to her husband, called "Sid and Dina". Dina focuses mainly on make up and hijabi fasion (which according to Global Islamic Economy report of 2015 states, will be worth an estimated $327 billion dollars by 2020).[58] She is also politically active on her blogs, speaking out against France's lack of women's rights and racism.[59] Dina has been branded by the Guardian as "arguably the most high profile hijabi blogger in the UK".[60] Their channels have accumulated 61.8 million views (with 536,000 subscribers),[61] and 20.3 million views (with 240,000 subscribers), respectively.[62][63] She started making videos at the same time she was working in a call centre.[54] She first began it as a hobby and then moved on to making it full time, which she has been able to do since 2013.[54] She has also featured on television, looking at the world of Muslim beauty contests, where she went to Indonesia in the BBC's "Muslim Miss World"; the Telegraph later criticised her for focusing too much on herself—however it should be noted that she was not responsible for the editing process.[64] Her second channel, concentrates on questions sent to them by their Muslim viewers, some being humourous, others being serious; their most viewed question is "LOST VIRGINITY AT 17!", with more than 500,000 views.[65][n. 20]

Sid and Dina.
Sid and Dina.

Dina Torkio (and Sid):— is a half-White, half-Egyptian British YouTuber,[54][55] who, along with her British Pakistani husband Sid own several large channels. One of them is Torkio's own fashion channel,[56][57][n. 21] "Dina Tokio", channel whilst the other belongs jointly to her husband, called "Sid and Dina". Dina focuses mainly on make up and hijabi fasion (which according to Global Islamic Economy report of 2015 states, will be worth an estimated $327 billion dollars by 2020).[58] She is also politically active on her blogs, speaking out against France's lack of women's rights and racism.[59] Dina has been branded by the Guardian as "arguably the most high profile hijabi blogger in the UK".[60] Their channels have accumulated 61.8 million views (with 536,000 subscribers),[61] and 20.3 million views (with 240,000 subscribers), respectively.[62][63] She started making videos at the same time she was working in a call centre.[54] She first began it as a hobby and then moved on to making it full time, which she has been able to do since 2013.[54] She has also featured on television, looking at the world of Muslim beauty contests, where she went to Indonesia in the BBC's "Muslim Miss World"; the Telegraph later criticised her for focusing too much on herself—however it should be noted that she was not responsible for the editing process.[64] Her second channel, concentrates on questions sent to them by their Muslim viewers, some being humourous, others being serious; their most viewed question is "LOST VIRGINITY AT 17!", with more than 500,000 views.[65][n. 22]

Over 250,000 Subscribers

Humza Arshad, portraying his character, Humza Badman.

Hamza Arshad:— is a YouTube comedian who is most well known for his "Diary of a Badman" series, which has accumulated over 40 million views since it was released in 2011. Overall Arshad has totalled 73.7 million views, and garnered 298,000 subscribers.[66] His channel was created on November 29th, 2009.[66] Arshad has created several characters and more than several different series which are "Chronicles of Tuttoo", "Diary of a Bad Man", "Smokey's Barbers", "Diary of a Bad Man", "Badman's Britain", "Bubblegum", "Black and Brown", "Badman Blogs", "Badman's World", "Badman", and "2 Man 1 Show". Arshad has also been involved with government projects (such as those of Scotland Yard[67]) and private body schemes to help the Muslim youth, such as Google's investment of $1,000,000 dollars that is designed to target "social issues" and "encourage tolerance", under the title of "The YouTube Creators for Change".[68][69][70] He is amongst six YouTubers who will benefit from the programme,[69] the others being Natalie Tran ("Community Channel"; Australia), Abdel en Vrai ("Abdel en vrai"; Belgium) and Nilam Farooq ("Nilam"; Turkey).[68][71] Arshad also won the "Best Video Channel" award at the Asian Media Awards in 2014 for his Diary of a Badman series (also making the websites "top ten" Desi channels[72]).[73] Arshad's potential earnings may be as high as $144,700 dollars over his YouTube career, excluding any sponsorship deals and government or private enterprise funding.[n. 23]

Others:— Other relevant Youtubers include lifestyle channel, Danielah M. Biah (286,850 subscribers, 13.5 million views) who is a Canadian Mexican-Palestnian female notable for having appeared alongside Karim (see above) in a number of viral videos,[74] gaming channel Hassan Al Hajry (461,422 subscribers, 342.5 million views),[75] make-up and hijab fashion channel, Amenakin (365,794 subscribers, 30.7 million views),[76] Muslim Queens (203,491 subscribers, 27.1 million views),[77] Chinutay A (295,786 subscribers, 9.2 million views),[78] Habiba Da Silva (276,806 subscribers, 15.6 million views),[79] and skits channel Sham Idrees (290,746 subscribers, 51.9 million views).[80] These statistics are accurate as of November 8th, 2016. Another person of interest who has more than 250,000 subscribers is Zaid Ali, a comedian from Canada. He operates several channels, although this is puzzling, given that these channels do not differ widely from one another. The channel with the most number of subscribers he has is ZaidAliT (with 503,341 subscribers and 56.6 million views),[81] followed by ZaidAliTV (which has 365,844 subscribers and 80 million views).[82] They are, oddly, claimed by two different networks, one is "Freedom!" (the owners of "OwnagePranks") and the other is "Studio71" (the owners of "Epic Meal Time").[83][84] Other interesting channels include Uldouz Wallace, The Apartment with Asif and Baluch, Carnage and Uosof ahmadi.

Daniela M. Biah, a Canadian Mexican-Palestinian Youtuber.
Humza Arshad, portraying his character, Humza Badman.

Hamza Arshad:— is a YouTube comedian who is most well known for his "Diary of a Badman" series, which has accumulated over 40 million views since it was released in 2011. Overall Arshad has totalled 73.7 million views, and garnered 298,000 subscribers.[66] His channel was created on November 29th, 2009.[66] Arshad has created several characters and more than several different series which are "Chronicles of Tuttoo", "Diary of a Bad Man", "Smokey's Barbers", "Diary of a Bad Man", "Badman's Britain", "Bubblegum", "Black and Brown", "Badman Blogs", "Badman's World", "Badman", and "2 Man 1 Show". Arshad has also been involved with government projects (such as those of Scotland Yard[67]) and private body schemes to help the Muslim youth, such as Google's investment of $1,000,000 dollars that is designed to target "social issues" and "encourage tolerance", under the title of "The YouTube Creators for Change".[68][69][70] He is amongst six YouTubers who will benefit from the programme,[69] the others being Natalie Tran ("Community Channel"; Australia), Abdel en Vrai ("Abdel en vrai"; Belgium) and Nilam Farooq ("Nilam"; Turkey).[68][71] Arshad also won the "Best Video Channel" award at the Asian Media Awards in 2014 for his Diary of a Badman series (also making the websites "top ten" Desi channels[72]).[73] Arshad's potential earnings may be as high as $144,700 dollars over his YouTube career, excluding any sponsorship deals and government or private enterprise funding.[n. 24]

Daniela M. Biah, a Canadian Mexican-Palestinian Youtuber.

Others:— Other relevant Youtubers include lifestyle channel, Danielah M. Biah (286,850 subscribers, 13.5 million views) who is a Canadian Mexican-Palestnian female notable for having appeared alongside Karim (see above) in a number of viral videos,[74] gaming channel Hassan Al Hajry (461,422 subscribers, 342.5 million views),[75] make-up and hijab fashion channel, Amenakin (365,794 subscribers, 30.7 million views),[76] Muslim Queens (203,491 subscribers, 27.1 million views),[77] Chinutay A (295,786 subscribers, 9.2 million views),[78] Habiba Da Silva (276,806 subscribers, 15.6 million views),[79] and skits channel Sham Idrees (290,746 subscribers, 51.9 million views).[80] These statistics are accurate as of November 8th, 2016. Another person of interest who has more than 250,000 subscribers is Zaid Ali, a comedian from Canada. He operates several channels, although this is puzzling, given that these channels do not differ widely from one another. The channel with the most number of subscribers he has is ZaidAliT (with 503,341 subscribers and 56.6 million views),[81] followed by ZaidAliTV (which has 365,844 subscribers and 80 million views).[82] They are, oddly, claimed by two different networks, one is "Freedom!" (the owners of "OwnagePranks") and the other is "Studio71" (the owners of "Epic Meal Time").[85][84] Other interesting channels include Uldouz Wallace, The Apartment with Asif and Baluch, Carnage and Uosof ahmadi.

See Also

Sources

Footnotes

  1. ^ This picture is from nigahiga's "Pranking FouseyTube!"
    1. nigahiga (May 31st, 2015). Pranking FouseyTube!. YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016
    Erakat has also been featured in other videos by Higa, such as his "I Dare You!" series.
    1. nigahiga (June 4th, 2015). I Dare You (ft. FouseyTube & Dtrix). YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  2. ^ His most successful videos have been "Spiderman In Real Life Prank!" (which has 128.3 million views), "Happy Ending Massage Prank!" (75.4 million views), "Mortal Kombat Elevator Prank!" (66.5 million views), "Yoga Pants Prank!" (44.7 million views) and the "Let's Have Sex Prank Backfires!" (39.6 million views).
    1. fouseyTUBE (videos). YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  3. ^ Erakat has bipolar disorder, which he was interviewed about with CNN in October 2016.
    1. Cristina Hernandez (October 11th, 2016). YouTube star on bipolar depression: 'I am proof that nothing can stop you'. CNN. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  4. ^ It is claimed by some websites that he is worth $2.8 million dollars.
    1. Bruce A. (July 8th, 2016). YOUSEF ERAKAT NET WORTH | FOUSEYTUBE. Rich Celebs. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
    However, given the fact that he has almost 2 billion views, it is possible he is worth far more. Japanese jvlogger "Gimmeaflakeman" revealed that Youtubers get $2,000 dollars per 1,000,000 views. If this is true, then Erakat has possibly earned more than $3,844,400 dollars from his YouTube channels in total.
  5. ^ By 2015, he had accumulated 896 million views.
    1. Daniel White (October 6th, 2015). YouTube Star FouseyTube Signs With Talent Agency. Time. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  6. ^ According to Mercury News; Quote: "FREMONT — It’s been less than a year since Yousef Erakat began uploading his comedy videos to YouTube as “FouseyTUBE.” Today, the Palestinian-American student at San Jose State University has a massive online fan base, with more than 147,000 YouTube subscribers and nearly 106,000 Facebook fans. Erakat’s videos, in which he dresses up like his parents, belly dances in Apple stores and generally pokes fun at Arab stereotypes, have received more than 31 million views — and counting. Now, the Fremont resident is bringing his stand-up routine on the road to cities across the United States, Canada and Australia."
    1. Rob Dennis (February 18th, 2012). San Jose State student goes viral with ‘FouseyTUBE’. Mercury News. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  7. ^ Saying this Eraket did speak out against Chris Kyle, who was a psychotic, racist sniper in the US army, who murdered Iraqi men, women and children. He later deleted the tweets however (how long after, is not known).
    1. Haseeb Rizvi (January 25th, 2015). Yousef Saleh Erakat aka FouseyTUBE speaks out against American Sniper: “this movie is propaganda”. The Muslim Vibe. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  8. ^ Fame has taken it's toll on Erakat. He has even cried on camera from all the stress he's suffered.
    1. Omar Shahid (September 2nd, 2014). What made YouTube’s two biggest male Muslim stars cry on camera?. Aquila Style. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  9. ^ This picture is from nigahiga's "Pranking FouseyTube!"
    1. nigahiga (May 31st, 2015). Pranking FouseyTube!. YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016
    Erakat has also been featured in other videos by Higa, such as his "I Dare You!" series.
    1. nigahiga (June 4th, 2015). I Dare You (ft. FouseyTube & Dtrix). YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  10. ^ His most successful videos have been "Spiderman In Real Life Prank!" (which has 128.3 million views), "Happy Ending Massage Prank!" (75.4 million views), "Mortal Kombat Elevator Prank!" (66.5 million views), "Yoga Pants Prank!" (44.7 million views) and the "Let's Have Sex Prank Backfires!" (39.6 million views).
    1. fouseyTUBE (videos). YouTube. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  11. ^ Erakat has bipolar disorder, which he was interviewed about with CNN in October 2016.
    1. Cristina Hernandez (October 11th, 2016). YouTube star on bipolar depression: 'I am proof that nothing can stop you'. CNN. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  12. ^ It is claimed by some websites that he is worth $2.8 million dollars.
    1. Bruce A. (July 8th, 2016). YOUSEF ERAKAT NET WORTH | FOUSEYTUBE. Rich Celebs. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
    However, given the fact that he has almost 2 billion views, it is possible he is worth far more. Japanese jvlogger "Gimmeaflakeman" revealed that Youtubers get $2,000 dollars per 1,000,000 views. If this is true, then Erakat has possibly earned more than $3,844,400 dollars from his YouTube channels in total.
  13. ^ By 2015, he had accumulated 896 million views.
    1. Daniel White (October 6th, 2015). YouTube Star FouseyTube Signs With Talent Agency. Time. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  14. ^ According to Mercury News; Quote: "FREMONT — It’s been less than a year since Yousef Erakat began uploading his comedy videos to YouTube as “FouseyTUBE.” Today, the Palestinian-American student at San Jose State University has a massive online fan base, with more than 147,000 YouTube subscribers and nearly 106,000 Facebook fans. Erakat’s videos, in which he dresses up like his parents, belly dances in Apple stores and generally pokes fun at Arab stereotypes, have received more than 31 million views — and counting. Now, the Fremont resident is bringing his stand-up routine on the road to cities across the United States, Canada and Australia."
    1. Rob Dennis (February 18th, 2012). San Jose State student goes viral with ‘FouseyTUBE’. Mercury News. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  15. ^ Saying this Eraket did speak out against Chris Kyle, who was a psychotic, racist sniper in the US army, who murdered Iraqi men, women and children. He later deleted the tweets however (how long after, is not known).
    1. Haseeb Rizvi (January 25th, 2015). Yousef Saleh Erakat aka FouseyTUBE speaks out against American Sniper: “this movie is propaganda”. The Muslim Vibe. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  16. ^ Fame has taken it's toll on Erakat. He has even cried on camera from all the stress he's suffered.
    1. Omar Shahid (September 2nd, 2014). What made YouTube’s two biggest male Muslim stars cry on camera?. Aquila Style. Retrieved October 13th, 2016.
  17. ^ Quote: "[Dig:] You moved to the United States from Jordan when you were two-years-old. Do you still practice your culture here? [Kassem:] My parents weren't really practicing Muslims to start with, so religion was never a big thing for myself. It allows me to stand in the middle when I'm interviewing people and the topic of religion comes up. I don't feel like I have to take a side or anything like that. At the same time, I feel like if I were to grow up under more religious circumstances, that's a whole other angle of comedy that can come from there. I grew up speaking English. I lived in Saudi Arabia for a time and moved to Florida when I was four. At the same time, I'm not ashamed of my background. I'm very proud of my Middle Eastern background and would love to go back and visit and see family that I haven't seen."
    1. Brittany Woolsey (February 1st, 2011). A Comedian's Youtube Success. DIG Magazine. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  18. ^ Quote: "[Dig:] You moved to the United States from Jordan when you were two-years-old. Do you still practice your culture here? [Kassem:] My parents weren't really practicing Muslims to start with, so religion was never a big thing for myself. It allows me to stand in the middle when I'm interviewing people and the topic of religion comes up. I don't feel like I have to take a side or anything like that. At the same time, I feel like if I were to grow up under more religious circumstances, that's a whole other angle of comedy that can come from there. I grew up speaking English. I lived in Saudi Arabia for a time and moved to Florida when I was four. At the same time, I'm not ashamed of my background. I'm very proud of my Middle Eastern background and would love to go back and visit and see family that I haven't seen."
    1. Brittany Woolsey (February 1st, 2011). A Comedian's Youtube Success. DIG Magazine. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  19. ^ Hijabi fashion bloggers often get criticised for doing what they do, particularly by men of all races.
    1. Zoe Kleinman (October 19th, 2015). Faith, hope and Call of Duty: 21st century spirituality. BBC News. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  20. ^ Dina has suffered issues of her own, which perhaps explains she and her husband set their second channel in their direction. Her issue surrounded her weight and bulimia, which she struggled with as a teenager.
    1. Dina Toki-O (September 18th, 2014). Keepin’ it real: Dina Toki-o and YazTheSpaz share their struggles with body image. Aquila Style. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  21. ^ Hijabi fashion bloggers often get criticised for doing what they do, particularly by men of all races.
    1. Zoe Kleinman (October 19th, 2015). Faith, hope and Call of Duty: 21st century spirituality. BBC News. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  22. ^ Dina has suffered issues of her own, which perhaps explains she and her husband set their second channel in their direction. Her issue surrounded her weight and bulimia, which she struggled with as a teenager.
    1. Dina Toki-O (September 18th, 2014). Keepin’ it real: Dina Toki-o and YazTheSpaz share their struggles with body image. Aquila Style. Retrieved October 14th, 2016.
  23. ^ This is based on the same footnote as applies to FouseyTUBE (see above).
  24. ^ This is based on the same footnote as applies to FouseyTUBE (see above).

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