Persecution of Muslims by Atheists (c. 1900—c. 2000)

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Atheism in Politics: Atheism as a political philosophy has been interwoven into politics for centuries but none more so than in the philosophy of communism; although many atheists distance themselves from it, claiming at best political atheism amounts to secularism (however this was actually founded by the Islamic philosopher Averroes,[1][2][3] who first advocated the separation of religion and state).[n. 1] Communism, itself was an "economic-political philosophy founded by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels" where "[i]n 1848 they wrote and published "The Communist Manifesto".".[4] Marx believed that religion originated from the primitive recesses of the human mind, and was "alien" to man.[5] He believed that communism provided the means for man to rid himself of God, and that in a purely atheistic society man would be free of religious burden.[6] He directly stated that "communism begins where atheism begins",[6] and also believed that "Christians and Jews must cease to be Christians and Jews if they wished to be free".[7] His most famous quote relates a drug to religious belief as it is "[i]t is the opium of the people".[8] Therefore communism is a form of political atheism, as it is dedicated to the destruction of religion (indeed those that pushed for communism were the worst dictators in human history, often motivated by atheistic beliefs to murder people; such were Mao Zedong, Joseph Stalin, and Pol Pot); however atheists today often claim this is solely down to communism not atheism; however the very core of communism has atheism built into it; though it's proponents will fervently deny any historical wrongs.[n. 2] Some examples follow.
The "Communist Manifesto".
Crimean Tatar families deported to the coldest parts of the Soviet Union (1944).[9]

USSR:— In the USSR, 180,000 Muslim Tatars were forcibly removed in 1944 for following Islam, with 50% dying of starvation and the rest suffering immense pain and hardship along the way.[10] It has been recognised as a form of genocide by Ukraine, after many Tatars fled there.[10] The Tatars were only allowed to repopulate Crimea in the latter half of the 1980s.[10] This group was not the only one to have been deported, but Chechens, Ingushs, Balkars, Karachays, and Meskhetian Turks all suffered the same fate too, albeit separately. Several organisations participated in the deportation-murders, including the "Tatar Union of the Godless" and the "League of Militant Atheists" (which had an active force of 3.5 million members).[11] The atheist state also deported 496,460 Chechen-Ingush Muslims, rushing them into trains and concentration camps in just six days, where a quarter of them died (124,115) by 1948 alone.[12] The cause of death was always starvation, thirst, cold weather and lack of shelter/accommodation which the tens of thousands of NKVD agents would never bother to provide.[13] At least 50,000 Meskhetian also died (with 26,000—40,000 Meskhetian Red Army soldiers also expelled with their famillies, after having fought for the USSR in WWII.[13] In total 130,000 were forcibly deported.[13] They was primarily because the Soviets planned to attack Muslim Turkey in 1945, and give away their territories to the Armenians (who themselves had committed genocide on Muslims by previously murdering 75,000—600,000[14]).[15]

Cambodian Genocide: The Cambodian Genocide, where at least 1.7 million people were killed, was directed by the atheist,[16][17][18][n. 3] and ethnic Khmer, Pol Pot, who murdered between 100,000—500,000 ethnic Cambodian Cham Muslims (14.3%—71.4% of their population;[19]).[20][21][n. 4] The Khmer Rouge regime was active in the 1970s, ruling Cambodia between 1975 and 1979.[22][23] The chief "ideologist" of this genocide was conducted by Nuon—"Brother Number 2"—Chea, who was previously the former governor of Khieu Samphan.[20] Chea was convicted in 2014 for crimes against humanity and sentenced to life imprisonment.[20] However, they were recalled back for a trial in November 2015 for killing Muslims.[20] Eye-witnesses described seeing 300 Muslim Cham women being rounded up and asked which ethnicity they were. When they replied "Cham" they were taken away, disappeared and had their bodies dumped in rivers.[20] The eye-witnesses were able to escape because they managed to trick the Khmer soldiers that they were Khmer instead of Cham. Documents of the time by the Khmer Rouge state "[t]he Cham nation no longer exists on Kampuchean [Cambodian] soil belonging to the Khmer...Accordingly, Cham nationality, language, customs and religious beliefs must be immediately abolished. Those who fail to obey this order will suffer all the consequences for their acts of opposition to Angkar [the Khmer Rouge high command]".[20] Ever since the regime was removed, Muslims have been treated well by the government, with the Cambodian Prime Minister even courting them respectfully for the 2013 elections.[24]
Location of Cambodia within South-east Asia.
The "Communist Manifesto".
Atheism in Politics: Atheism as a political philosophy has been interwoven into politics for centuries but none more so than in the philosophy of communism; although many atheists distance themselves from it, claiming at best political atheism amounts to secularism (however this was actually founded by the Islamic philosopher Averroes,[1][2][3] who first advocated the separation of religion and state).[n. 5] Communism, itself was an "economic-political philosophy founded by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels" where "[i]n 1848 they wrote and published "The Communist Manifesto".".[4] Marx believed that religion originated from the primitive recesses of the human mind, and was "alien" to man.[5] He believed that communism provided the means for man to rid himself of God, and that in a purely atheistic society man would be free of religious burden.[6] He directly stated that "communism begins where atheism begins",[6] and also believed that "Christians and Jews must cease to be Christians and Jews if they wished to be free".[7] His most famous quote relates a drug to religious belief as it is "[i]t is the opium of the people".[8] Therefore communism is a form of political atheism, as it is dedicated to the destruction of religion (indeed those that pushed for communism were the worst dictators in human history, often motivated by atheistic beliefs to murder people; such were Mao Zedong, Joseph Stalin, and Pol Pot); however atheists today often claim this is solely down to communism not atheism; however the very core of communism has atheism built into it; though it's proponents will fervently deny any historical wrongs.[n. 6] Some examples follow.
Crimean Tatar families deported to the coldest parts of the Soviet Union (1944).[25]

USSR:— In the USSR, 180,000 Muslim Tatars were forcibly removed in 1944 for following Islam, with 50% dying of starvation and the rest suffering immense pain and hardship along the way.[10] It has been recognised as a form of genocide by Ukraine, after many Tatars fled there.[10] The Tatars were only allowed to repopulate Crimea in the latter half of the 1980s.[10] This group was not the only one to have been deported, but Chechens, Ingushs, Balkars, Karachays, and Meskhetian Turks all suffered the same fate too, albeit separately. Several organisations participated in the deportation-murders, including the "Tatar Union of the Godless" and the "League of Militant Atheists" (which had an active force of 3.5 million members).[26] The atheist state also deported 496,460 Chechen-Ingush Muslims, rushing them into trains and concentration camps in just six days, where a quarter of them died (124,115) by 1948 alone.[12] The cause of death was always starvation, thirst, cold weather and lack of shelter/accommodation which the tens of thousands of NKVD agents would never bother to provide.[13] At least 50,000 Meskhetian also died (with 26,000—40,000 Meskhetian Red Army soldiers also expelled with their famillies, after having fought for the USSR in WWII.[13] In total 130,000 were forcibly deported.[13] They was primarily because the Soviets planned to attack Muslim Turkey in 1945, and give away their territories to the Armenians (who themselves had committed genocide on Muslims by previously murdering 75,000—600,000[14]).[15]

Location of Cambodia within South-east Asia.
Cambodian Genocide: The Cambodian Genocide, where at least 1.7 million people were killed, was directed by the atheist,[16][17][27][n. 7] and ethnic Khmer, Pol Pot, who murdered between 100,000—500,000 ethnic Cambodian Cham Muslims (14.3%—71.4% of their population;[19]).[20][21][n. 8] The Khmer Rouge regime was active in the 1970s, ruling Cambodia between 1975 and 1979.[22][23] The chief "ideologist" of this genocide was conducted by Nuon—"Brother Number 2"—Chea, who was previously the former governor of Khieu Samphan.[20] Chea was convicted in 2014 for crimes against humanity and sentenced to life imprisonment.[20] However, they were recalled back for a trial in November 2015 for killing Muslims.[20] Eye-witnesses described seeing 300 Muslim Cham women being rounded up and asked which ethnicity they were. When they replied "Cham" they were taken away, disappeared and had their bodies dumped in rivers.[20] The eye-witnesses were able to escape because they managed to trick the Khmer soldiers that they were Khmer instead of Cham. Documents of the time by the Khmer Rouge state "[t]he Cham nation no longer exists on Kampuchean [Cambodian] soil belonging to the Khmer...Accordingly, Cham nationality, language, customs and religious beliefs must be immediately abolished. Those who fail to obey this order will suffer all the consequences for their acts of opposition to Angkar [the Khmer Rouge high command]".[20] Ever since the regime was removed, Muslims have been treated well by the government, with the Cambodian Prime Minister even courting them respectfully for the 2013 elections.[24]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. ^ He also invented modern rationalism.
    1. Reed Business Information (30 October 1980). New Scientist. Reed Business Information. p. 274. ISSN 02624079.
  2. ^ For example, in books such as "50 Great Myths About Atheism", an entire chapter is dedicated to attempts to try and disprove the fact that it was atheism which motivated the communists to carry out genocides.
    1. 50 Great Myths About Atheism. John Wiley & Sons. 12 August 2013. p. 87. ISBN 978-1-118-60781-7.
    However the arguments of this book are pertinently made devoid of any credibility by another;
    1. Andy Bannister (17 July 2015). The Atheist Who Didn't Exist: Or the dreadful consequences of bad arguments. Monarch Books. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-85721-611-3.
  3. ^ Some New Atheists even tend to shift the goal posts and claim atheists such as Stalin, Pol Pot and Mao were acting based on religion (thereby stretching the definition of what religion actually is).
    1. Phil Ryan (2014). After the New Atheist Debate. University of Toronto Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-1-4426-2687-4.
  4. ^ The population estimate for the Cham's is believed to be 700,000. If between 100,000 and 500,000 were killed, this corresponds to a range of 14.3% to 71.4% being killed.
    1. Post Staff (March 10th, 2006). How many Cham killed important genocide evidence. Phnom Pen Post. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.
  5. ^ He also invented modern rationalism.
    1. Reed Business Information (30 October 1980). New Scientist. Reed Business Information. p. 274. ISSN 02624079.
  6. ^ For example, in books such as "50 Great Myths About Atheism", an entire chapter is dedicated to attempts to try and disprove the fact that it was atheism which motivated the communists to carry out genocides.
    1. 50 Great Myths About Atheism. John Wiley & Sons. 12 August 2013. p. 87. ISBN 978-1-118-60781-7.
    However the arguments of this book are pertinently made devoid of any credibility by another;
    1. Andy Bannister (17 July 2015). The Atheist Who Didn't Exist: Or the dreadful consequences of bad arguments. Monarch Books. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-85721-611-3.
  7. ^ Some New Atheists even tend to shift the goal posts and claim atheists such as Stalin, Pol Pot and Mao were acting based on religion (thereby stretching the definition of what religion actually is).
    1. Phil Ryan (2014). After the New Atheist Debate. University of Toronto Press. p. 15. ISBN 978-1-4426-2687-4.
  8. ^ The population estimate for the Cham's is believed to be 700,000. If between 100,000 and 500,000 were killed, this corresponds to a range of 14.3% to 71.4% being killed.
    1. Post Staff (March 10th, 2006). How many Cham killed important genocide evidence. Phnom Pen Post. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.

References

  1. ^ a b Phil Zuckerman (4 December 2014). Living the Secular Life: New Answers to Old Questions. Penguin Publishing Group. p. 36. ISBN 978-0-698-17008-7.
  2. ^ a b Roy J. Shephard (27 November 2014). An Illustrated History of Health and Fitness, from Pre-History to our Post-Modern World. Springer. p. 277. ISBN 978-3-319-11671-6.
  3. ^ a b Andrew Edwards; Suzanne Edwards (23 September 2016). Andalucia: A Literary Guide for Travellers. I.B.Tauris. p. 171. ISBN 978-0-85772-865-4.
  4. ^ a b History and Backround of Communism. University of Stanford. Retrieved November 29th, 2016.
  5. ^ a b John Torrance (4 May 1995). Karl Marx's Theory of Ideas. Cambridge University Press. p. 73. ISBN 978-0-521-44066-0.
  6. ^ a b c d John Cunningham Wood (14 October 1987). Karl Marx's Economics: Critical Assessments. Psychology Press. p. 420. ISBN 978-0-415-06558-0.
  7. ^ a b Franz Mehring (1 May 2003). Karl Marx: The Story of His Life. Psychology Press. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-415-31333-9.
  8. ^ a b Spencer J. Pack (1 January 2010). Aristotle, Adam Smith and Karl Marx: On Some Fundamental Issues in 21st Century Political Economy. Edward Elgar Publishing. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-84980-547-6.
  9. ^ A. R. Momin (May 2014). CRIMEAN TATARS. Vol. 8. Issue 24. 01-15 May 2014. iOS Minaret. Way-Back Machine Link. Retrieved January 18th, 2017.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Ukraine calls Soviet deportation of Muslims 'genocide'. November 13th, 2015. Al Jazeera. Retrieved January 19th, 2017.
  11. ^ Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1973. pp. 7, 385.
  12. ^ a b Philipp Ther (30 May 2014). The Dark Side of Nation-States: Ethnic Cleansing in Modern Europe. Berghahn Books. p. 118. ISBN 978-1-78238-303-1.
  13. ^ a b c d e f James Minahan (30 May 2002). Encyclopedia of the Stateless Nations: Ethnic and National Groups Around the World A-Z (4 Volumes). ABC-CLIO. pp. 1, 240. ISBN 978-0-313-07696-1.
  14. ^ a b Rudolph J. Rummel (1998). Statistics of Democide: Genocide and Mass Murder Since 1900. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 83. ISBN 978-3-8258-4010-5.
  15. ^ a b Alexandre Bennigsen,; Marie Broxup, (3 June 2014). The Islamic Threat to the Soviet State (Routledge Revivals). Routledge. p. 30. ISBN 978-1-317-83171-6.
  16. ^ a b Andy Bannister (17 July 2015). The Atheist Who Didn't Exist: Or the dreadful consequences of bad arguments. Monarch Books. pp. 23–24. ISBN 978-0-85721-611-3.
  17. ^ a b William J. Elenchin (1 January 2009). Hidden Courage: Reconnecting Faith and Character with Mental Wellness. Wipf and Stock Publishers. p. 53. ISBN 978-1-60608-111-2.
  18. ^ The Dawkins' Delusion. Lulu.com. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-84753-095-0.
  19. ^ a b James Waller (2 June 2016). Confronting Evil: Engaging Our Responsibility to Prevent Genocide. Oxford University Press. p. 102. ISBN 978-0-19-930070-9.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Clothilde Le Coz (November 19th, 2015). The question of genocide and Cambodia's Muslims. Al Jazeera. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.
  21. ^ a b Post Staff (March 10th, 2006). How many Cham killed important genocide evidence. Phnom Pen Post. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.
  22. ^ a b Karl DeRouen, Jr.; Uk Heo (28 March 2007). Civil Wars of the World: Major Conflicts Since World War II. ABC-CLIO. p. 224. ISBN 978-1-85109-919-1.
  23. ^ a b Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime. August 4th, 2014. BBC News. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.
  24. ^ a b Vong Sokheng (May 6th, 2013). ‘lucky to live in Cambodia’, PM says. Phnom Pen Post. Retrieved January 21st, 2017.
  25. ^ A. R. Momin (May 2014). CRIMEAN TATARS. Vol. 8. Issue 24. 01-15 May 2014. iOS Minaret. Way-Back Machine Link. Retrieved January 18th, 2017.
  26. ^ Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1973. pp. 7, 385.
  27. ^ The Dawkins' Delusion. Lulu.com. p. 161. ISBN 978-1-84753-095-0.

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