The Katyr-Yurt Russian Terrorist Attack

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Grozny, 2000. The Russians bombed the city with illegal weaponry, too afraid to face the Chechens face to face.

Introduction:— The Katyr-Yurt terrorist attack,[n. 1] was an attack by the Russian military on the village Katyr Yurt, that occurred between February 4th—7th, 2000. The village was a part of the Achkhoy-Martan province, Chechnya, and had a population of 25,000 people;[1] declared a "safe zone" by Putin's government.[2] The Russians refused to warn[n. 2] the village of an imminent advance of Russian soldiers from Grozny who were tracking down Chechan soldiers[3]—the latter fighting for the freedom of their country, and the other for annexation. Bloodied, the Chechens reached the village for food, water, rest and medicine (fleeing from the terrible bombardment of Russian terrorism and minefields, dragging their dead with them[4]), the Russians tore apart the village using hundreds—possibly thousands—of unguided bombs murdering 363—400 people.[2][5] All available exit routes—but not the entrances to the village—had been cut off,[3] with the residents left severely confused, horrified and panic stricken as to why this was happening. A little eight year old girl—Taisa Abakarov—was the only survivor of the attack, having almost been burnt to a crisp and left in a severe coma.[2] On March 4th, she learned of her families fate.[2] Her parents Mansur (1955) and Khava (1954), brothers Ruslan (1987) and Magomed (1985), sister Madina (1994)—as well as her cousin Khava Abakarova—did not survive.[2] She sued 15 years later for €500,000 euros, but was only awarded €314,775 euros from the ECHR as compensation for their deaths from Russia.[3]

Grozny, 2000. The Russians bombed the city with illegal weaponry, too afraid to face the Chechens face to face.

Introduction:— The Katyr-Yurt terrorist attack,[n. 3] was an attack by the Russian military on the village Katyr Yurt, that occurred between February 4th—7th, 2000. The village was a part of the Achkhoy-Martan province, Chechnya, and had a population of 25,000 people;[1] declared a "safe zone" by Putin's government.[2] The Russians refused to warn[n. 4] the village of an imminent advance of Russian soldiers from Grozny who were tracking down Chechan soldiers[3]—the latter fighting for the freedom of their country, and the other for annexation. Bloodied, the Chechens reached the village for food, water, rest and medicine (fleeing from the terrible bombardment of Russian terrorism and minefields, dragging their dead with them[4]), the Russians tore apart the village using hundreds—possibly thousands—of unguided bombs murdering 363—400 people.[2][5] All available exit routes—but not the entrances to the village—had been cut off,[3] with the residents left severely confused, horrified and panic stricken as to why this was happening. A little eight year old girl—Taisa Abakarov—was the only survivor of the attack, having almost been burnt to a crisp and left in a severe coma.[2] On March 4th, she learned of her families fate.[2] Her parents Mansur (1955) and Khava (1954), brothers Ruslan (1987) and Magomed (1985), sister Madina (1994)—as well as her cousin Khava Abakarova—did not survive.[2] She sued 15 years later for €500,000 euros, but was only awarded €314,775 euros from the ECHR as compensation for their deaths from Russia.[3]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. ^ The reason why it is a terrorist attack is because the Russians engaged in operations to terrorise the Chechens. In their capital city, "[t]he unprecedented ultimatum to citizens to get out of Grozny or to be destroyed as if they were bandits, amounts to terrorism conducted by the state".
    1. Opinion: A Chechen view of Russia's war. December 26th, 1999. BBC News. Retrieved January 31st, 2017.
  2. ^ The Russians would blackmail the residents of villages and force them to hand over their money. If they didn't they would be murdered. According to the BBC and the Moscow Times; "An undercover reporter from the Moscow Times newspaper told the BBC villagers had been buying their survival from Russian troops only too ready to accept their offers of cash and weapons...If an agreement is reached and the ransom or the bribe is paid the Russians stop the bombing. She says she discovered evidence of a practice thought to have been widespread in the 1994-96 war. "When Russian troops approach a village they do some shelling, cause some damage and kill some people," she said. "The older Chechen men then talk to the Russian troops and discuss the terms of surrender of the village. "If an agreement is reached and the ransom or the bribe is paid the Russians stop the bombing. "The village is supposed to give rebels and weapons to the Russian troops.". The village of Katyr-Yurt had previously paid $5,500 in order to not get murdered. However they Russians dishonoured this and murdered them anyway some time later.
    1. Chechens 'buy off' Russian troops. January 17th, 2000. BBC News. Retrieved January 31st, 2017.
  3. ^ The reason why it is a terrorist attack is because the Russians engaged in operations to terrorise the Chechens. In their capital city, "[t]he unprecedented ultimatum to citizens to get out of Grozny or to be destroyed as if they were bandits, amounts to terrorism conducted by the state".
    1. Opinion: A Chechen view of Russia's war. December 26th, 1999. BBC News. Retrieved January 31st, 2017.
  4. ^ The Russians would blackmail the residents of villages and force them to hand over their money. If they didn't they would be murdered. According to the BBC and the Moscow Times; "An undercover reporter from the Moscow Times newspaper told the BBC villagers had been buying their survival from Russian troops only too ready to accept their offers of cash and weapons...If an agreement is reached and the ransom or the bribe is paid the Russians stop the bombing. She says she discovered evidence of a practice thought to have been widespread in the 1994-96 war. "When Russian troops approach a village they do some shelling, cause some damage and kill some people," she said. "The older Chechen men then talk to the Russian troops and discuss the terms of surrender of the village. "If an agreement is reached and the ransom or the bribe is paid the Russians stop the bombing. "The village is supposed to give rebels and weapons to the Russian troops.". The village of Katyr-Yurt had previously paid $5,500 in order to not get murdered. However they Russians dishonoured this and murdered them anyway some time later.
    1. Chechens 'buy off' Russian troops. January 17th, 2000. BBC News. Retrieved January 31st, 2017.

References

  1. ^ a b Ralph Crawshaw; Leif Holmström (13 October 2014). Essential Rules of Behaviour for Police in Armed Conflict, Disturbance and Tension: Legal Framework, International Cases and Instruments. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. p. 261. ISBN 978-90-04-25228-8.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j John Sweeney (March 5th, 2000). Revealed: Russia's worst war crime in Chechnya. The Guardian. Retrieved January 31st, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Søren Nielsen, András Sajó (March 14th, 2016). CASE OF ABAKAROVA v. RUSSIA (Application no. 16664/07), JUDGMENT, STRASBOURG, 15 October 2015. European Court of Human Rights (EHCR). Retrieved January 31st, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Wojciech Jagielski (4 January 2011). Towers of Stone: The Battle of Wills in Chechnya. Seven Stories Press. p. 237. ISBN 978-1-60980-039-0.
  5. ^ a b Ali Askerov (22 April 2015). Historical Dictionary of the Chechen Conflict. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 29. ISBN 978-1-4422-4925-7.

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