Why Do Europeans Dislike Erdogan?

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The Turkish economy has made significant inroads ever since Erdogan came to power in 2002. Under his leadership the economy grew to a high of $823 billion dollars.

Erdogan was born on February 26th, 1954,[1] and had extremely humble beginnings, coming from a family of five siblings who had moved to Istanbul sometime in 1967 for a better life.[2][3] He was especially hard working in his younger years, even selling lemonade and sesame buns in his teenage years in his spare time for extra money.[3] European governments (who's own populations are extensively dissatisfied with their own governments[n. 1]) despise him, as do anti-Muslim[n. 2] racists.[4] Erdogan's importance has been highlighted by the great track record he has imprinted upon Turkey. When he came to power in 2002, the economy was only worth about $231 billion dollars per year, but by 2014, it had more than tripled the GDP to $800 billion dollars in the space of about 12 years.[5] In addition, the country had had an inflation rate of 45%, but it was crushed down to 6.5% by 2011.[6] Furthermore, between 2002 and 2011, Erdogan had kept the economy growing at an extremely rapid pace, averaging an economic growth rate that hit 6.05% year on year, and, subtracting away the global recession of 2008, this average rises to 8.37%.[n. 3] Additionally, it's GDP growth rate was growing so fast that it was trailing just behind China and India.[7] Even during the Coup of 2016, Turkey was able to bounce back with a strong economic performance of 4%.[8] In the long term, Turkey's economy has significantly diversified in 20 years, with no reliance on any single market (the biggest is Germany at under 10%).[9]

The Turkish people are strong believers in democracy, visible by the extremely high turnout rates for their general elections. Voter turnout was 87.1% in 1999, in the 2002 general election, turnout was 79.1%, which rose to 84.2% in 2007, having stabilised in 2011 at 83.2%.[10] During this time, Erdogan was elected and served as Prime Minister of Turkey between 2003—2014,[11] before winning Turkey's first presidential election in 2014 with a 52% majority.[12] Voter turnout at this election was 73.8%.[13] Erdogan first began his political career, when he was elected Mayor of Istanbul in 1994, and served in office until 1998. He had won by a landslide, obtaining 25.2% of the vote.[14] Erdogan was arrested and jailed for practising his right to free speech in 1998 however, in writing a pro-Muslim poem, which was classified as "hate speech" (however, he was only quoting a famous Turkish nationalist, Ziya Gokalp,[15] who actually wrote the words).[16] He was taken to jail, but not before a 2,000 car envoy consisting of his most ardent supporters followed his escort to prison in solidarity.[16] The quote stated "[o]ur minarets are our bayonets, Our domes are our helmets, Our mosques are our barracks. We will put a final end to ethnic segregation. No one can ever intimidate us. If the skies and the ground were to open against us. If floods and volcanoes were to burst, We will not turn from our mission. My reference is Islam. If I am not able to speak of this, What is the use of living?"[16] He served four of a ten month sentence.[17]

A crowd of supporters. During the coup d'etat of 2016, where tens of thousands of his supporters defended him.[18]
Erdogan's tall stature has probably proved intimidating to European leaders.[n. 4]

It has been postulated by Turkish analysts that the true reason why Europe, and by extension their media, does not like Erdogen, is primarily because he does not put the interests of Europe first, over Turkey's national interest.[19] James Jeffrey, a former US ambassador to Ankara, has openly discussed stated for instance that; "Erdoğan is not liked in Washington. He is not liked in Europe either...[t]he West dealt with more authoritarian leaders before Erdoğan, and it still does. But the difference is that the Saudis, the Egyptians - please excuse my language - wheedle us in all circumstances...[b]ut Erdoğan confronts us, flings our contradictions in our faces. He is not trying to become a pal, while leaders who are more authoritarian than him don't see a problem in posing as if they are good friends of ours...[b]eyond Erdoğan, there is an overall dislike of Turks in Washington. The Turkish military is so difficult, they do not just present arms and go to fight DAESH, they negotiate for months while the other countries send four...[t]hey in effect do nothing, but they still get positive points".[19] Analysts have snapped back, retorting that the "Turkish people do not care if he does not make things easier for Western countries for the sake of their interests". They add "[i]t is because Erdoğan's behavior against the West [we] do not feel obliged to make them satisfied, [and] not lick their boots".[19] Erdogan has not been afraid to confront Europeans either, openly calling them "fascist", adding that Turkey will not be threatened by the EU.[20]

The Turkish economy has made significant inroads ever since Erdogan came to power in 2002. Under his leadership the economy grew to a high of $823 billion dollars.

Erdogan was born on February 26th, 1954,[1] and had extremely humble beginnings, coming from a family of five siblings who had moved to Istanbul sometime in 1967 for a better life.[2][3] He was especially hard working in his younger years, even selling lemonade and sesame buns in his teenage years in his spare time for extra money.[3] European governments (who's own populations are extensively dissatisfied with their own governments[n. 5]) despise him, as do anti-Muslim[n. 6] racists.[4] Erdogan's importance has been highlighted by the great track record he has imprinted upon Turkey. When he came to power in 2002, the economy was only worth about $231 billion dollars per year, but by 2014, it had more than tripled the GDP to $800 billion dollars in the space of about 12 years.[5] In addition, the country had had an inflation rate of 45%, but it was crushed down to 6.5% by 2011.[6] Furthermore, between 2002 and 2011, Erdogan had kept the economy growing at an extremely rapid pace, averaging an economic growth rate that hit 6.05% year on year, and, subtracting away the global recession of 2008, this average rises to 8.37%.[n. 7] Additionally, it's GDP growth rate was growing so fast that it was trailing just behind China and India.[7] Even during the Coup of 2016, Turkey was able to bounce back with a strong economic performance of 4%.[8] In the long term, Turkey's economy has significantly diversified in 20 years, with no reliance on any single market (the biggest is Germany at under 10%).[9]

A crowd of supporters. During the coup d'etat of 2016, where tens of thousands of his supporters defended him.[18]

The Turkish people are strong believers in democracy, visible by the extremely high turnout rates for their general elections. Voter turnout was 87.1% in 1999, in the 2002 general election, turnout was 79.1%, which rose to 84.2% in 2007, having stabilised in 2011 at 83.2%.[10] During this time, Erdogan was elected and served as Prime Minister of Turkey between 2003—2014,[11] before winning Turkey's first presidential election in 2014 with a 52% majority.[12] Voter turnout at this election was 73.8%.[13] Erdogan first began his political career, when he was elected Mayor of Istanbul in 1994, and served in office until 1998. He had won by a landslide, obtaining 25.2% of the vote.[14] Erdogan was arrested and jailed for practising his right to free speech in 1998 however, in writing a pro-Muslim poem, which was classified as "hate speech" (however, he was only quoting a famous Turkish nationalist, Ziya Gokalp,[15] who actually wrote the words).[16] He was taken to jail, but not before a 2,000 car envoy consisting of his most ardent supporters followed his escort to prison in solidarity.[16] The quote stated "[o]ur minarets are our bayonets, Our domes are our helmets, Our mosques are our barracks. We will put a final end to ethnic segregation. No one can ever intimidate us. If the skies and the ground were to open against us. If floods and volcanoes were to burst, We will not turn from our mission. My reference is Islam. If I am not able to speak of this, What is the use of living?"[16] He served four of a ten month sentence.[17]

Erdogan's tall stature has probably proved intimidating to European leaders.[n. 8]

It has been postulated by Turkish analysts that the true reason why Europe, and by extension their media, does not like Erdogen, is primarily because he does not put the interests of Europe first, over Turkey's national interest.[19] James Jeffrey, a former US ambassador to Ankara, has openly discussed stated for instance that; "Erdoğan is not liked in Washington. He is not liked in Europe either...[t]he West dealt with more authoritarian leaders before Erdoğan, and it still does. But the difference is that the Saudis, the Egyptians - please excuse my language - wheedle us in all circumstances...[b]ut Erdoğan confronts us, flings our contradictions in our faces. He is not trying to become a pal, while leaders who are more authoritarian than him don't see a problem in posing as if they are good friends of ours...[b]eyond Erdoğan, there is an overall dislike of Turks in Washington. The Turkish military is so difficult, they do not just present arms and go to fight DAESH, they negotiate for months while the other countries send four...[t]hey in effect do nothing, but they still get positive points".[19] Analysts have snapped back, retorting that the "Turkish people do not care if he does not make things easier for Western countries for the sake of their interests". They add "[i]t is because Erdoğan's behavior against the West [we] do not feel obliged to make them satisfied, [and] not lick their boots".[19] Erdogan has not been afraid to confront Europeans either, openly calling them "fascist", adding that Turkey will not be threatened by the EU.[20]

Sources

Footnotes

  1. ^ Satisfaction with the European Union amounts to 40%—72%, and 17%—92% for their individual countries in 2012. Turkey by contrast had a satisfaction rate of 93% when Erdogan was elected in 2002, which although it had fallen to 51% in 2014, has always remained in Erdogan's favour, except for one year in 2013.
    1. Sara B. Hobolt (2012). Citizen Satisfaction with Democracy in the European Union. JCMS 2012 Volume 50. Number S1. pp. 88–105. London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
    2. Country Satisfaction in Turkey through the Years. July 29th, 2014. Pew Global. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  2. ^ Erdogan himself has been brave enough to confront Europe about it's Islamophobia/Anti-Muslim behaviours and racism.
    1. James Lillywhite (June 25th, 2016). Turkey's president Erdogan says Europe is 'Islamophobic and racist'. IB Times. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  3. ^ The figures have been taken from Turner (2013).
    1. Barry Turner (2013). The Statesman's Yearbook 2014: The Politics, Cultures and Economies of the World. Springer. p. 1235. ISBN 978-1-349-59643-0.
  4. ^ France once stated that the EU would never allow a country with 70 million Muslims into the EU, still showing that France is a racist country.
    1. Sari Orabi (March 21, 2017). Why does Europe hate Erdogan?. Middle-east Monitor. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  5. ^ Satisfaction with the European Union amounts to 40%—72%, and 17%—92% for their individual countries in 2012. Turkey by contrast had a satisfaction rate of 93% when Erdogan was elected in 2002, which although it had fallen to 51% in 2014, has always remained in Erdogan's favour, except for one year in 2013.
    1. Sara B. Hobolt (2012). Citizen Satisfaction with Democracy in the European Union. JCMS 2012 Volume 50. Number S1. pp. 88–105. London School of Economics and Political Science. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
    2. Country Satisfaction in Turkey through the Years. July 29th, 2014. Pew Global. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  6. ^ Erdogan himself has been brave enough to confront Europe about it's Islamophobia/Anti-Muslim behaviours and racism.
    1. James Lillywhite (June 25th, 2016). Turkey's president Erdogan says Europe is 'Islamophobic and racist'. IB Times. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  7. ^ The figures have been taken from Turner (2013).
    1. Barry Turner (2013). The Statesman's Yearbook 2014: The Politics, Cultures and Economies of the World. Springer. p. 1235. ISBN 978-1-349-59643-0.
  8. ^ France once stated that the EU would never allow a country with 70 million Muslims into the EU, still showing that France is a racist country.
    1. Sari Orabi (March 21, 2017). Why does Europe hate Erdogan?. Middle-east Monitor. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.

References

  1. ^ a b Christopher Riches; Jan Palmowski (15 September 2016). A Dictionary of Contemporary World History. OUP Oxford. pp. 714. ISBN 978-0-19-106076-2.
  2. ^ a b M. Hakan Yavuz (19 February 2009). Secularism and Muslim Democracy in Turkey. Cambridge University Press. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-521-88878-3.
  3. ^ a b c d Recep Tayyip Erdogan: Turkey's pugnacious president. 17 April 2017. BBC News. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Soumaya Ghannoushi (21 July 2016). Why is Turkey's Erdogan being demonised in the West?. Middle-east Eye. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Simon Waldman; Emre Caliskan (1 March 2017). The New Turkey and Its Discontents. Oxford University Press. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-19-066837-2.
  6. ^ a b Barry Turner (2013). The Statesman's Yearbook 2014: The Politics, Cultures and Economies of the World. Springer. p. 1235. ISBN 978-1-349-59643-0.
  7. ^ a b William Hale; Ergun Ozbudun (17 September 2009). Islamism, Democracy and Liberalism in Turkey: The Case of the AKP. Routledge. p. 106. ISBN 978-1-135-21492-0.
  8. ^ a b Yeliz Candemir (March 31, 2016). Turkish Economy Defies Political Chaos With Further Growth. Wall Street Journal. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  9. ^ a b Turkey’s Diversified Economy in the last 20 Years. March 19th, 2015. Hands on Turkish. WayBack Machine Link. Retrieved April 19th, 2017.
  10. ^ a b Ali Çarkoglu (2011). Turkey’s 2011 General Elections: Towards a Dominant Party System?. Koç University. Insight Turkey. Vol. 13. No. 3. 2011. pp. 43-62. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  11. ^ a b Spencer C. Tucker (14 December 2015). U.S. Conflicts in the 21st Century: Afghanistan War, Iraq War, and the War on Terror (3 volumes): Afghanistan War, Iraq War, and the War on Terror. ABC-CLIO. p. 289. ISBN 978-1-4408-3879-8.
  12. ^ a b Umut Uras (11 August 2014). Erdogan wins Turkey's presidential election Provisional results show PM. Al Jazeera. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  13. ^ a b Ali Hussein Bakeer (27 August 2014). New Turkey: 2014 Presidential Elections and Future Implications. Al Jazeera. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  14. ^ a b Nebi miş; Ali Aslan (18 November 2014). Erdoğan’s Politics and His Presidential Mission. SETA. p. 9. GGKEY:Z54NY4GJXZU.
  15. ^ a b Christopher Panico; Human Rights Watch (Organization) (1999). Turkey: Violations of Free Expression in Turkey. Human Rights Watch. p. 64. ISBN 978-1-56432-226-5.
  16. ^ a b c d e f Hakan Aslaneli (March 27th, 1999). Erdogan goes to prison. Hurriyet Daily News. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  17. ^ a b Turkey's charismatic pro-Islamic leader. 4 November, 2002. BBC News. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  18. ^ a b Erdogan supporters on the streets of Turkey. 18 July 2016. Al Jazeera. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  19. ^ a b c d e f Merve Şebnem Oruc (August 17, 2016). Why doesn't the West like Erdoğan?. Daily Sabah. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.
  20. ^ a b Samuel Osborne (21 March 2017). Recep Tayyip Erdogan slams 'fascist and cruel' Europe and says Turkey may review ties after powers referendum. The Independent. WayBackMachine Link. Retrieved April 20th, 2017.

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